pizzopaps:

i’m like an npc i won’t do anything unless you interact with me

dudewheresmyhalla:

See now I’m on a feminism bender and I want to talk about all the female characters done massive injustice by this fandom.

Let’s talk about Anora. Let’s also have a fucking talk about Isabela. In fact, let’s have a riveting discussion RE: fandom reactions to “betrayals” of female characters vs. male characters.

Read More

arrowacevarric:

every time I read about lavellan being a spy I laugh because I imagine them just straight up walking into the conclave like “what is up my fellow chantry worshipers, praise the andraste” and no one noticing because templars have like 20/200 vision

cadash is better about it and just keeps repeating “FINE DWARVEN CRAFTS, DIRECT FROM ORZIMMAR”

Oh jeez, I did not need to see my coworker’s face photoshopped onto Conan the Barbarian.

My poor innocent mind will never be the same after working with these people.

allroundlostcause:

NO
STOP IT
REASONS YOU COULD HAVE LOST A FOLLOWER:
Someone deleted a blog
Someone left your fandom
Someone is overwhelmed by their dash
Someone doesn’t appreciate you [GOODBYE AND GOOD LUCK]
Someone needs to take some time away and can’t be tempted by your blog
They don’t like something you love (yes, it’s okay, man! This is why we create the dash we want)
They feel more comfortable keeping a slow dash and stalking others
Tumblr is a dick sometimes
Not reasons you lost a follower:
You suck
Stop worrying. I am not kidding, dudes, stop worrying, stop commenting, know that we all create the dash we want, know that we don’t delete a blog with the hope of having someone feel sad that they are down a follower. Know that it’s better to post what makes YOU happy than what makes others happy.
That insanely popular blog you love too? It loses followers every day.
That underrated oc? It does too. But the people who stay are the ones who matter the most to that one person.
If you value the loss of people who don’t stay over the loyalty of the people who do, you’re missing the point.
I get it. It hurts. But take a step back. Remember why you are here. Think about the people who love you. They are going nowhere.

allroundlostcause:

NO

STOP IT

REASONS YOU COULD HAVE LOST A FOLLOWER:

  1. Someone deleted a blog
  2. Someone left your fandom
  3. Someone is overwhelmed by their dash
  4. Someone doesn’t appreciate you [GOODBYE AND GOOD LUCK]
  5. Someone needs to take some time away and can’t be tempted by your blog
  6. They don’t like something you love (yes, it’s okay, man! This is why we create the dash we want)
  7. They feel more comfortable keeping a slow dash and stalking others
  8. Tumblr is a dick sometimes

Not reasons you lost a follower:

  1. You suck

Stop worrying. I am not kidding, dudes, stop worrying, stop commenting, know that we all create the dash we want, know that we don’t delete a blog with the hope of having someone feel sad that they are down a follower. Know that it’s better to post what makes YOU happy than what makes others happy.

That insanely popular blog you love too? It loses followers every day.

That underrated oc? It does too. But the people who stay are the ones who matter the most to that one person.

If you value the loss of people who don’t stay over the loyalty of the people who do, you’re missing the point.

I get it. It hurts. But take a step back. Remember why you are here. Think about the people who love you. They are going nowhere.

Fenris: *says that he went through a ritual he only remembers cause it was agonizing and remembers nothing else from his past, including his family*
Fenris: *was enslaved and sexually abused by mages and was so under Danarius's control he snapped and killed the only people who had shown him kindness*
Fenris: *sister turns out to be alive and she betrays him to the man who abused him and he feels alone in every way possible even when he has friends because he lost what little he had to of his past*
Fandom: God, Fenris is soooo whiny!

plystation:

seeing your post on your dash

image

dudewheresmyhalla:

Now I want to yell about Vivienne and how people are writing her off. Today is gonna be a long one for any following me who isn’t into radical lady love.

She’s stated as being pro-Circle. She’s stated as having a “true agenda.” That’s all we know about her philosophy/standpoint yet. It’s not a lot.

Pro-Circle doesn’t mean pro-Chantry, though. The Circle is its own independent community that exists to educate and guide mages, and it can be cut off from the Chantry and operate as a truly independent, self-governing community. Enchanters of the Circle of Magi who support that most commonly join the Libertarian Fraternity of Enchanters.

What if Vivienne is a Libertarian? She’s probably not openly Libertarian, because obviously she’s got a position in the Orlesian Court that she needs to maintain, and maintaining that probably comes with a fair amount of respectability politics. She has to look like the good mage. But what if, through the whole game, we think she supports the Chantry and then when it comes time to broker peace and decide on a solution, she speaks in favor of the Circle’s independence and removing the Chantry from its position of power? What if that is the “true agenda” that she’s hiding?

Y’all are writing her off for failing to be yet another in a long-enough line of open rebels and would-be martyrs, when we don’t actually know anything about her philosophy yet other than that she supports the Circle.

ssv-normandy:

when people casually mention something you’re completely obsessed with and it takes every fuckin ounce of your self control not to propel yourself into the stars and scream for the rest of eternity about how much you love the thing

me: one does not simply go on tumblr for '5 minutes'.
Dragon Age: Inquisition Combat Q&A

jaderaven93:

image

Can we customise AI tactics as in the previous games (i.e. drink a health potion when below 25% health)? —@WordsToGold, Twitter

[DANIEL KADING]: Yes. The interface has changed, but it includes the ability to customize what skills your allies use, when they will (or won’t!) use potions based on their health and how many potions you have left, and set targeting rules such as guarding certain allies or attacking the leader’s target.

Do weapons and armor degrade over time? If so, can they be repaired in the field? —@Wild_Morrigan, Twitter

[DK]: No equipment decay! Thedosian merchants give their products lifetime guarantees, which was a pretty shrewd business move what with the apocalyptic sky-hole.

How will cooldown work with abilities? —@FreshRevenge, Twitter, United States

[MARK DARRAH]: Cooldowns are still there. You can have eight abilities mapped on the console, which gives you opportunities.

[DK]: Different abilities have different cooldowns, which can sometimes be reduced with upgrades or passives. Particularly powerful abilities may have relatively long cooldowns, making you carefully choose when to use them—or perhaps to combo them with abilities that reset your cooldowns.

Will there be any enemies with instant death moves? —Michael Lao, Facebook, United States.

[DK]: None of the enemies have sync-kill/instant death moves… though with the right combination of difficulty setting, a low-level party, and wandering-into-places-you-ain’t-‘sposed-ta-be, a 1-hit knockout isn’t out of the question.

Can I have two swords again? —Matthew Orsini, Facebook

[MD]: Warriors have the choice of two-handed weapons or sword and shield.

[DK]: Dual-wielding daggers is otherwise only available to a rogue.

I’m not very good at being a strategic player, but I really WANT to be. Will there be some sort of stepping stones to allow players like me to graduate from more simple, action-oriented combat to a more strategic way of thinking? —Haley Livermore, Facebook

[DK]: Many battles are in locations that allow you to “scout” your opponents before they notice you, giving you the time to analyze tactical opportunities the environment offers: chokepoints for warriors, blind approaches for rogues, enemies in vulnerable locations, etc. Sometimes your allies will spot opportunities in these fights and make suggestions on strategies of approach.  

Will weapons be as interchangeable as they were in [Dragon Age:] Origins, or class-restricted like DA-II? —Jacob Wasylenko, Facebook

[DK]: Class-restricted, though our animators provided some beautiful variant attack styles within each melee weapon set. For instance, rogues perform different attacks depending on whether they’re armed with single- or double-bladed daggers.

Are you going to bring back Arcane Warrior? —Robert Pennington, Facebook, United States

[MD]: Something similar will exist, but we’ll get to that a bit later on.

Will there be finishing moves as in Dragon Age: Origins (like the jumping final blow seen against ogres)? —Kai Chen, Facebook, Germany

[DK]: No finishing blows; however, many of our damaging abilities are built to have a “good” way to use them, and a “better” way to use them. Mighty Blow is a massive overhead strike available to two-handed warriors that deals damage and knocks a foe to the ground—but if you use it on a foe already on the ground, it deals triple damage.

Is there a completely new combat skill that you can describe/reveal? —@MarkDLentz, Twitter, United States

[DK]: There’s a fun one put together by our ability designers, Jon Fuller and Luke Barrett, called Fallback Plan. Only Varric, and possibly your Inquisitor, gain access to this ability, which lets you place a gadget on the ground; if you get into trouble later, you can instantly relocate to that position. If you upgrade it, you’ll also be set back to the level of health you had upon placing the gadget, and—if you are standing close to an enemy—you’ll kidnap the enemy back with you. By combining this with stealth, and placing traps or mage glyphs under the marker, many hijinks can ensue.

Is health and mana not regenerating between battles still a thing at this point? —@starcicles, Twitter, United States

[DK]: Mana and stamina regenerate. Health does not, requiring you to be careful about overextending yourself in your adventures. Potions are your primary method of healing in the field, though there are a few rare abilities that can be used tactically to regain health.

Will there still be cross-class combos, or any sort of similar system? —@blanketcocoon, Twitter

[DK]: There are cross-class combos, with unique effects caused by different combinations of rogue, mage, and warrior abilities.

Do all mage followers have good healing spells or will some be better at it than others? —Josh Rodrigues, Facebook, United States

[MD]: We are focusing more mage tactics on defensive abilities (like Barrier) than healing.

Are there any other benefits to the Inquisitor’s “Fade power” other than being able to close tears in the Fade? —Dominic Freckelton, Facebook

[DK]: Most of the rifts in the Fade are defended by powerful, newly emerged demons that still bear a connection to the Fade. These battles are difficult, but the Inquisitor can use their power to even the odds by getting close enough to “disrupt” the Fade rift during these fights, which will send a powerful shockwave out that heavily damages and stuns its defenders.

[MIKE LAIDLAW]: As the Inquisitor masters his or her control of the mark, it may unlock another use that’s a little more global as well.

How, exactly, does focus work in the game? —RJ May, Facebook, United States

[DK]: Focus is earned as a party, but spent as an individual. Focus is given to all party members when any of them damage a foe: this allows lower-damage characters like defensive warriors to fulfill their role while still accumulating focus. After enough is earned, a character can use an ability that costs focus. That character’s focus is then spent, but not the focus of their allies, who can still use it for their own abilities.  

[ML]: Focus requires you to think long-term. You may need it to get out of a sticky situation, or you may want to save it for a particularly tough battle you’re anticipating. Because focus abilities can’t be used every fight, the combat team has been able to “turn up” their effectiveness. They can be real game-changers if deployed strategically.

Are there any missions in game that might unlock new spells/abilities for our character, or will it solely be a level up system? —Kristen Coates, Facebook

[MD]: There is one…

[ML]: Mark’s being cryptic about one particular element of the game, so I won’t spoil that, but I will say that specializations are earned, not granted for free. You will be able to preview all the specialization abilities available to you before you make a choice of which path you want to follow. It’s worth noting that unlike in the previous DA games, we’ve decided to bulk out the specializations more, but you will have to choose one to follow with your character. They add a lot of depth to your tactical options, but we wanted them to be actually special.

image

(x)

brennacedria:

bellisadinosaur:

eyeofsithis:

inspiring-the-mind:

awesome

This is what fighting a high dragon in Dragon Age is like

That green one spends the entire fight just getting thrown around.

In all of my experiences with dragons in DA, the green one is Zevran. I’m sorry, Zev lovers, but it’s true. I tried taking him to dragon fights, I tried speccing him though the whole damn game as nothing but an archer so he’d stay out of the way when fighting dragons, and it always looks like this instead.

brennacedria:

bellisadinosaur:

eyeofsithis:

inspiring-the-mind:

awesome

This is what fighting a high dragon in Dragon Age is like

That green one spends the entire fight just getting thrown around.

In all of my experiences with dragons in DA, the green one is Zevran. I’m sorry, Zev lovers, but it’s true. I tried taking him to dragon fights, I tried speccing him though the whole damn game as nothing but an archer so he’d stay out of the way when fighting dragons, and it always looks like this instead.

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.
One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.
Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.
As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?
I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.
Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.

One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.

Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.

As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?

I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.

Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

freckledandholy:

if i lay here

if i just lay here

do u think this fanfic will write itself

socialjusticekoolaid:

What they won’t show you on CNN tonight: Ferguson residents line a parade of roses down W Florissant, leading to where Mike Brown was taken from this world. #staywoke #powerful #insolidarity